Train Your Brain to Remember Anything You Learn With This Simple, 20-Minute Habit inc.com Oct 27, 2019 10:45 AM This 100-year old method has been making the rounds again–it’s worth getting around to. | Fastest Delivery Of Magazine
Connect with us
//pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/js/adsbygoogle.js (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

Published

on

Recently, a colleague and I were lamenting the process of growing older and the inevitable increasing difficulty of remembering things we want to remember . That becomes particularly annoying when you attend a conference or a learning seminar and find yourself forgetting the entire session just days later.
But then my colleague told me about the
Ebbinghaus Forgetting Curve, a 100-year-old formula developed by German psychologist Hermann Ebbinghaus, who pioneered the experimental study of memory. The psychologist’s work has resurfaced recently and has been making its way around college campuses as a tool to help students remember lecture material. For example, the University of Waterloo explains the curve and how to use it on their Campus Wellness website. I teach at Indiana University and a student mentioned it to me in class as a study aid he uses. Intrigued, I tried it out too–more on that in a moment.
The Forgetting Curve describes how we retain or lose information that we take in, using a one-hour lecture as the basis of the model. The curve is at its highest point (the most information retained) right after the one-hour lecture. One day after the lecture, if you’ve done nothing with the material, you’ll have lost between 50-80 percent of it from your memory.
By day seven that erodes to about 10 percent retained and by day 30, the information is virtually gone (only 2-3 percent retained). After this, without any intervention, you’ll likely need to relearn the material from scratch.
Sounds about right from my experience.
But here comes the amazing part–how easily you can train your brain to reverse the curve.
With just 20 minutes work you’ll retain almost all of what you learned.
This is possible through the practice of what’s called spaced intervals, where you revisit and reprocess the same material, but in a very specific pattern. Doing so means it takes you less and less time to retrieve the information from your long-term memory when you need it. Here’s where the 20-minutes and very specific spaced intervals come in.
Ebbinghaus’ formula calls for you to spend 10 minutes reviewing the material within 24 hours of having received it (that will raise the curve back up to almost 100 percent retained again). Seven days later, spend five minutes to “reactivate” the same material and raise the curve up again. By day 30, your brain only needs two to four minutes to completely “reactivate” the same material, again raising the curve back up.
Thus, a total of 20 minutes invested in review at specific intervals and voila, a month later you have fantastic retention of that interesting seminar. After that, monthly “brush ups” of just a few minutes will help you keep the material fresh.
Here’s what happened when I tried it.
I put the specific formula to the test. I keynoted at a conference and was also able to take in two other one-hour keynotes at the conference. For one of the keynotes I took no notes, and sure enough, just shy of a month later I can barely remember any of it.
For the second keynote, I took copious notes and followed the spaced interval formula. A month later, by golly, I remember virtually all of the material. And in case if you’re wondering, both talks were equally interesting to me–the difference was the reversal of Ebbinghaus’ Forgetting Curve.
So the bottom line here is if you want to remember what you learned from an interesting seminar or session, don’t take a “cram for the exam” approach when you want to use the info. That might have worked in college (although Waterloo University specifically advises against cramming, encouraging students to follow the aforementioned approach instead). Instead, invest the 20-minutes (in spaced out intervals) so that a month later it’s all still there in the old noggin.

Loading...

Am Humble and simple but hate *shit* I'm popularly address as Ballotech due to my optmost ideal and researchs on technology, I graduated from federal poly Ede and represent my able faculty and various research ground.

Advertisement //pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/js/adsbygoogle.js (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({ google_ad_client: "pub-7404936528073869", enable_page_level_ads: true });
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Education

UTME 2020: JAMB withdraws licenses of 11 centres, gives reasons

Published

on

By

UTME 2020: JAMB withdraws licenses of 11 centres, gives reasons 72160f3a jamb logo 1024x576 1

The Joint Admission and Matriculation Board (JAMB) has withdrawn licences from 11 centres for charging candidates exorbitant amount in the ongoing 2020 Unified Tertiary Matriculation Examinations (UTME) registration.

Prof. Ishaq Oloyede, Registrar of the board, made this known in Abuja on Tuesday, at an interactive session with stakeholders.

The News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) reports that the stakeholders comprises – the Nigerian Security and Civil Defence Corp (NSCDC), banks, E-transact, Digital Partner Network, Interswitch and other service providers.

Oloyede said that the proliferation of tutorial centres was a major concern as most of the centres engaged in fraud and corruption, during registrations and examinations.

Oloyede said that charging above the stipulated N4,700 for the 2020 UTME registration was illegitimate and would only destroy the nation; as it was an act of fraud and corruption.

He said that the exorbitant amount could have negative effects on the nation as well as having effects in destroying the system.

“Many people make illegitimate money from the examination and we will be destroying the nation, if we don’t get things right.

“Prior to 2018, we sell form for N5,000; but the federal government considers so many things and felt the money was much and in 2018, President Muhammadu Buhari decided that the cost should be slashed; which brought the cost to N3,500.

” Also, prior to this time, there were unscrupulous people selling as high as N10,000. We now democratised the sale of the forms, to make it available so that it will not be possible for those selling to hoard the forms.

“We felt the banks are overcrowded so we decided to expand the sales outlet, to bring in mobile money operators to cover all the registered banks.

“The effects of the expansion is that some people are still penetrating the banks, thereby increasing the cost of the sale of form, ” he said.

Oloyede said that the board was magnanimous enough to pay the sum of N210 as commission for each of the forms sold, to about 2 million candidates nationwide, saying extorting the candidates was unjust.

He added that the board was working closely with the Nigeria Security and Civil Defence Corps (NSCDC), to ensure that any agent who sold above the prescribed fee was brought to book.

He, therefore, called on NSCDC to assist in arresting any erring centre while also calling on candidates to report any centre involved in the act, to commandants in their various states.

He also said that the board, in a bid to eradicate the problems and as well as to ensure tracking, had directed its agents selling forms to ensure they have the National Identity Number (NIN).

The registrar listed some of the centres whose licences were withdrawn as: Federal Polytechnics, Mubi; Adamawa; Adazi-Nnukwu ICT/CBT for selling forms at N5,000, Emkenlyn Computers, Nnaemeka Secondary School Anambra.

Others were: New Kings and Queens Bayelsa, for selling at N5,500; Brightfield Secondary School Delta, for selling between N6,000 and N8,000; A-Pagen Consolidated Port Harcourt, for selling at N5,000 and Influential School Port Harcourt, for selling at N6,000.

NAN also reports that the cost of the registration is N3,500, cost of materials is N500 and N700 for the CBT centres; totalling N4,700.
Meanwhile, the Commandant General, NSCDC, Mr Abdullahi Muhammadu, urged the board to limit the tutorial centres in the country, while making sure that lists of certified tutorial centres were revealed to reduce infractions, as it relates to examinations.

Muhammadu also called on commandants in the various states, to make integrity their watchword, in order not to betray the confidence the board have in them as well as Nigerians.

Loading...
Continue Reading

Education

Benue govt upgrades State Colleges of Education to Polytechnics

Published

on

By

Benue govt upgrades State Colleges of Education to Polytechnics 20200121 023544

The Benue State Executive Council on Monday approved the conversion of Akawe Torkula College of Advanced and Professional Studies, ATCAPS, Makurdi to Akawe Torkula Polytechnic, ATP, Makurdi.

The Council made this known in a statement signed by the Permanent Secretary of Ministry of Information, Culture and Tourism, James Agbo.

It also approved the conversion of Akperan Orshi College of Agriculture, Yandev, AOCAY, to Akperan Orshi Polytechnic, Yandev, AOPY, Yandev.

Agbo said Governor Samuel Ortom, who presided over the meeting gave the two approvals on Monday at the Benue Peoples House, Makurdi.

According to the council, the decision to convert the two institutions to polytechnics is to enable them meet accreditation requirements set by National Board for Technical Education, NBTE.

He said, ”it was the considered decision of the Council that Akperan Orshi Polytechnic and Akawe Torkula Polytechnic will begin to offer fully accredited diploma courses in various disciplines with graduates of the two institutions also participating in National Youth Service Corps.

”The approval of the State Executive Council is to be sent to the State House of Assembly for amendment of the laws establishing the institutions.”

Also, the Council approved the termination of contract for the extension of electricity from Gbajimba to Tse-Akaahena in Guma local government area.

It also approved the termination of contract for the construction of the feeder road which covers Tse-Ortom-Tse-Upev-Tse-Akaahena-Nasarawa border in Guma local government area of the state.

The statement reads in part, ”the decision of Council to terminate the two contracts was based on the fact that the contractor, Dan-Ella Global Business Services Limited had abandoned the projects, contrary to terms of the agreement it signed with Benue State Government three years ago.

”The company is expected to refund the sum of N54.3 million on the abandoned road project and N26.5 million on the abandoned electricity project. Council further directed the Ministry of Rural Development and Cooperatives to award the affected contracts to a qualified and competent company.

”The Council also commenced deliberations on the proposed Benue State Geographical Information Services for land administration in the state.”

Loading...
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement

Inspirational Tips

Advertisement
Loading...

Trending

WhatsApp Join Our WhatsApp Chat
Open chat
%d bloggers like this: